GDC 2006

As the years have passed I have been reaping diminishing returns from the lectures at the game developer’s conference, so I spent most of my time there in roundtables. This offered a great opportunity to talk to the more interesting GDC participants with similar interests.

Wednesday

The Sex in Games roundtable was hosted by Brenda Brathwaite, who sometimes laments her new-found position as the ‘woman who talks about sex in games.’ One new thing I discovered in this roundtable is that everyone already knows Second Life is where it’s at for sexual play in an online environment.
The most talked about online erotica environment I heard about is Naughtly America which provides a stylized place for adults to mingle.
At one point, I was put on the spot to provide a good idea for something new in online erotic entertainment. The best idea I could come up with was to provide a cross-world matchmaking service; however, it looks like sexingames.net is already targeting this kind of service.
The most interesting idea I heard was the rapture.net (sorry, I could not find a good URL) which I hear is positioning itself as a P2P multiplayer erotica online experience with persistent characters and toys instead of worlds. It would be cheaper to run than Second Life, and certainly has some interesting angles on charging for P2P content exchanges.

I also attended a historical perspective on sex in video games, mostly presented by Brenda again with Kyle Machulis providing an interesting meatspace demo at the end. Brenda broke down the types, some of the controversy, as well as the issues. Second Life was continually credited with holding the cutting edge on adult content.
One of the recurring themes in producing adult content in games is appropriate diversity, storytelling, and finding what turns people on. I believe that Second Life already has the diversity, and I invite residents to think of clever new ways to develop roles for people to play in the context in Second Life to provide a story and something hot.

The whole day reminded me of the famous Avenue Q song.

Thursday

I attended a roundtable on building the metaverse roadmap hosted by Bridget Agabra Goldstein and Jerry Paffendorf. Again, I am pounded with how secretly popular Second Life has become outside these walls. Jerry and crew are trying to build a cross-business roadmap for where virtual worlds will be going in the next 5, 10, an 15 year timeframe. Check out their website for more details on their goals.
During the discussion, I kept thinking it would be useful to have some way to snapshot your own personal worldview, ala Google Zeitgeist, over time and analyze how that changes.

I also attended the Security and Privacy in Games roundtable, which was not nearly as interesting as the moderator, Elonka.

During a talk on building highly physical game worlds hosted by Sean Blanchfield from Demonware. The whole talk reeked of an attempt from networking middleware to sniff out how to sensibly combine physics and the network, without any participants from the physics middleware providers.

\P/hoenix

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4 Responses to GDC 2006

  1. So why couldn’t the networking middleware and the physics middleware work together? I mean, Havok is already an amazing physics engine to begin with. It might not be a good plan to try and re-write it in the context of a network enviornment.

    Also, isn’t it Avenue Q and not Q Avenue (I’m being picky, but it’s my nature as a musical fan :P)

  2. I think it’s a great idea to combine the two since the interaction between network latency and untrusted clients in a physical world is difficult to resolve. The problem with the talk is that no physics middleware providers were present to give their perspective.

    P.S.: whoops. it’s been corrected.

  3. Why would LL even suport Sex in Second Life. from what i have heard from friends that have left tg for mg say that MG is all about the porn. if i had a choice between the tg and the mg for life i would pick the tg due to seeing porn ever time i wana build something is just not right

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